SMSC – a guide for the classroom

SMSC 3

More information can be found in two related posts about SMSC here and here.

 

SMSC provision isn’t a new bolt on that needs to be added to lessons, it is already embedded in the curriculum. This document will hopefully help you identify what you are already doing that contributes to SMSC outcomes.

 

Enable pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self- confidence

 

Probably doing Possible opportunities
Teachers should be acting as role models of the values desired in pupils Where pupils already have religious or non religious beliefs, support and encourage these beliefs in ways which are personal and relevant to the pupils
Value pupils’ questions and give them space for their own thoughts, ideas, and concerns Encourage pupils to explore and critically analyse what interests and inspires themselves and others
Ensure an environment is created where every child may reach their potential
Help pupils to be aware of their potential and support them to achieve it
Encourage pupils to reflect and learn from reflection
Encourage individual endeavour and celebrate achievement and success
Encourage pupils to work and cooperate as part of a team
Provide opportunities for pupils to develop leadership skills and challenge, and develop self-reliance

 

 

 

Enable pupils to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the law

 

 

Probably doing Possible opportunities
Provide a clear framework of values and behaviours which is promoted consistently, with teachers as role models; Teach pupils how today’s legal system has evolved and why it is important, and help them understand the law and the importance of abiding by it;
Reward good insight and behaviour Give pupils opportunities to explore and develop moral concepts and values
Address discrimination and promote equality Teach pupils about citizenship, and the importance of being a good citizen
Discuss in an informed and balanced way breaches of agreed moral codes where they arise, and their impact on society and themselves
Provide models of virtue through literature, humanities, sciences, arts, assemblies, relevant role models, and acts of worship;
Reinforce the importance of a cohesive, harmonious, law abiding society though images, posters, classroom displays , exhibitions, etc;

 

 

 

Encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative and understand how they can contribute to community life

 

 

Probably doing Possible opportunities 
Foster a sense of community, with common and inclusive values which ensure that everyone can flourish School linking or partnership work to give pupils the chance to mix with pupils from different areas/cultures/faith
  • Encourage pupils to work co-operatively

 

Help pupils to develop personal qualities which are valued in society, for example, thoughtfulness, honesty, respect for difference and sound moral principles
Provide positive group activities Provide opportunities for participating in different communities
  • Encourage pupils to take responsibility for their actions

 

Ensure opportunities are provided for pupils to demonstrate initiative, develop their interests and organise activities for themselves and others.
Provide opportunities for pupils to exercise leadership and responsibility

Provide pupils with a broad general knowledge of public institutions and services in England

 

 

Probably doing Possible opportunities
  • Ensure that all pupils have a voice that is listened to

 

Teach pupils about democracy and citizenship, and the importance of being a good citizen
Provide positive and effective links with the world of work and the wider community Ensure that pupils are aware of their rights and the rights of others as human beings
Teach pupils about what public institutions and services are available
Provide opportunities for pupils to learn about and engage in local and national democratic processes

 

 

Assist pupils to acquire an appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures in a way that promotes tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions

 

 

Probably doing Possible opportunities 
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to explore their own cultural assumptions and values

 

Provide opportunities for pupils to participate in cultural events and encourage pupils to reflect on their significance
Provide opportunities for pupils to mix with children from other cultures
Give pupils the opportunity to explore different values, beliefs, and cultures
Present authentic accounts of the attitudes, values and traditions of diverse cultures
Develop partnerships with outside agencies and individuals to extend pupils’ cultural awareness

 

 

Share

SMSC – what is it?

SMSC 2

More information can be found in two related posts about SMSC here and here.

 

What is SMSC?

Important to provide some basic definitions of the components of SMSC:

 

Spiritual development –It is about the development of a sense of identity, self-worth, personal insight, meaning and purpose. It is about the development of a pupil’s spirit, soul, personality or character.

 

Moral development – enabling pupils to build a framework of moral values, aligned with the law of the land, which regulates their personal behaviour. It is also about gaining an understanding of the range of views and the reasons for the range. It is also about developing an opinion about the different views.

 

Social development – young people working effectively with each other and the development of the inter-personal skills necessary for successful relationships. It is about functioning effectively in a multi-racial, multi-cultural society and making a positive contribution to the school community and wider society.

 

Cultural development – helping pupils to develop an understanding of their own culture and other cultures in their town, region and in the country as a whole. Promoting pupils’ cultural development is intimately linked with schools’ attempts to value cultural diversity and prevent racism.

 

The Importance of SMSC

Ofsted state “the most important role of teaching is to promote learning and to raise pupils’ achievement”.  This is immediately followed by teaching “is also important in promoting their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development”.  We can expect that all observations will have a clear focus upon SMSC provision in the classroom.

 

The focus upon SMSC is important as a school can be judged as ‘requires improvement’ because there are “weaknesses in the overall provision for pupils’ SMSC”.  If Ofsted observe “important weaknesses in the overall provision for pupils’ SMSC” then the school will be judged to be ‘inadequate’.

 

SMSC provision is outlined in each of the four key judgements and the overall judgement.

 

Implementing SMSC into the classroom

There are five parts to the SMSC regulations, which are shown below:

  • Enable pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self- confidence
  • Enable pupils to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the law
  • Encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative and understand how they can contribute to community life
  • Provide pupils with a broad general knowledge of public institutions and services in England
  • Assist pupils to acquire an appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures in a way that promotes tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions

 

I expect that almost all of your lessons currently provide opportunities for SMSC. You can pick from the following examples to highlight how you are providing opportunities to develop SMSC.  These should be highlighted in your lesson plans.

 

Enable pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self- confidence

Possible actions

  • Promote teaching styles which value pupils’ questions and give them space for their own thoughts, ideas, and concerns;
  • Teachers should be acting as role models of the values desired in pupils
  • Ensure an environment is created where every child may reach their potential regardless of gender, race, disability, or other equalities issues;
  • Help pupils to be aware of their potential and support them to achieve it;
  • Where pupils already have religious or non religious beliefs, support and encourage these beliefs in ways which are personal and relevant to the pupils;
  • Provide opportunities for spiritual development through learning outside the classroom, for example drama, music, art, visits to museums, historic buildings;
  • Encourage pupils to explore and critically analyse what interests and inspires themselves and others;
  • Encourage pupils to reflect and learn from reflection;
  • Encourage individual endeavour and celebrate achievement and success, both within and outside the classroom, such as through drama, sports, music and outdoor pursuits;
  • Encourage pupils to work and cooperate as part of a team;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to develop leadership skills and challenge so they can take care of themselves and others, and develop self-reliance.

 

Enable pupils to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the law

Possible actions

  • Teach pupils how today’s legal system has evolved and why it is important, and help them understand the law and the importance of abiding by it;
  • Provide a clear framework of values and behaviours which is promoted consistently through all aspects of the school, with teachers as role models;
  • Inform parents of school ethos and procedures so that what is learnt at school can be supported at home, and ensure this ethos aligns with the law of the land;
  • Give pupils opportunities across the curriculum to explore and develop moral concepts and values, such as right and wrong, justice, personal rights and responsibilities;
  • Reward good insight and behaviour;
  • Teach pupils about citizenship, and the importance of being a good citizen;
  • Discuss in an informed and balanced way breaches of agreed moral codes where they arise, and their impact on society and themselves;
  • Provide models of virtue through literature, humanities, sciences, arts, assemblies, relevant role models, and acts of worship;
  • Reinforce the importance of a cohesive, harmonious, law abiding society though images, posters, classroom displays, exhibitions, etc;
  • Address discrimination on the grounds of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age and other criteria, and promote racial and other forms of equality.

 

Encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative and understand how they can contribute to community life

Possible actions

  • Foster a sense of community, with common and inclusive values which ensure that everyone, irrespective of ethnic origin, nationality, gender, ability, sexual orientation, and religious or non-religious beliefs, can flourish;
  • Encourage pupils to work co-operatively;
  • Provide positive group activities, for example, through assemblies, team activities, residential experiences, school theatre and music productions;
  • Encourage pupils to take responsibility for their actions, for example, respect for property, care of the environment, and developing codes of behaviour;
  • School linking or partnership work to give pupils the chance to mix with pupils from different areas/cultures/faith;
  • Help pupils to develop personal qualities which are valued in society, for example, thoughtfulness, honesty, respect for difference and sound moral principles;
  • Provide opportunities for participating in different communities – for example, religious, cultural, local and global;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to exercise leadership and responsibility;
  • Ensure that through lessons and other formal and informal settings opportunities are provided for pupils to demonstrate initiative, develop their interests and organise activities for themselves and others.

 

Provide pupils with a broad general knowledge of public institutions and services in England

Possible actions

  • Teach pupils about democracy and citizenship, and the importance of being a good citizen;
  • Ensure that all pupils within the school have a voice that is listened to;
  • Ensure that pupils are aware of their rights and the rights of others as human beings;
  • Teach pupils about what public institutions and services are available, what they are for, and how they are funded;
  • Provide positive and effective links with the world of work (for example, shadowing, work experience, and visits from professionals) and the wider community (for example school visits, including to public institutions, taking part in community events);
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to learn about and engage in local and national democratic processes, including having democratic processes within the school such as a school council whose members are voted for by the pupils.

 

Assist pupils to acquire an appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures in a way that promotes tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions

Possible actions

  • Provide opportunities for pupils to explore their own cultural assumptions and values;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to participate in literature, drama, music, art, crafts and other cultural events and encourage pupils to reflect on their significance;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to mix with children from other cultures, for example through school linking programmes;
  • Give pupils the opportunity to explore different values, beliefs, and cultures through a variety of approaches, including discussion and debate, in order to gain understanding;
  • Present authentic accounts of the attitudes, values and traditions of diverse cultures;
  • Develop partnerships with outside agencies and individuals to extend pupils’ cultural awareness, for example, theatre, museum, concert and gallery visits, resident artists and foreign exchanges;
  • Audit the quality and nature of opportunities for pupils to extend their cultural development across the curriculum, particularly developing an understanding of the cultures of the UK.
Share

SMSC – Social, Moral, Spiritual and Cultural Education

SMSC

I have been spending time looking at the SMSC guidelines and how they impact upon our school.  I wanted to clarify my thoughts about SMSC so I went about putting together a document for my own benefit.  I shared this with SLT before providing a reduced version for our Middle Leaders.  I finally put together a list of suggestions that teachers could easily implement into their own lessons.  We also added a SMSC section on our lesson observation form.

 

The Importance of SMSC

Schools that ignore SMSC do so at their peril. A school can be judged as ‘requires improvement’ because there are “weaknesses in the overall provision for pupils’ SMSC”.  If Ofsted observe “important weaknesses in the overall provision for pupils’ SMSC” then the school will be judged to be ‘inadequate’.

SMSC is outlined in each of the four key judgements and the overall judgement.

Ofsted provide the following examples of where SMSC can be found within the school: “where pupils:

  • are reflective about beliefs, values and more profound aspects of human experience, using their imagination and creativity, and developing curiosity in their learning
  • develop and apply an understanding of right and wrong in their school life and life outside school
  • take part in a range of activities requiring social skills
  • develop awareness of and respect for diversity in relation to, for example, gender, race, religion and belief, culture, sexual orientation and disability
  • gain a well-informed understanding of the options and challenges facing them as they move through the school and on to the next stage of their education and training
  • develop an appreciation of theatre, music, art and literature
  • develop the skills and attitudes to enable them to participate fully and positively in democratic modern Britain
  • respond positively to a range of artistic, sporting and other cultural opportunities
  • understand and appreciate the range of different cultures within school and further afield as an essential element of their preparation for life.”

School inspection handbook from September 2012

 

What is SMSC?

Important to provide some basic definitions of the components of SMSC:

 

Spiritual development – the development of the non-material element of a human being which animates and sustains us and, depending on our point of view, either ends or continues in some form when we die. It is about the development of a sense of identity, self-worth, personal insight, meaning and purpose. It is about the development of a pupil’s ‘spirit’. Some people may call it the development of a pupil’s ‘soul’; others as the development of ‘personality’ or ‘character’.

 

Moral development – enabling pupils to build a framework of moral values, aligned with the law of the land, which regulates their personal behaviour. It is also about the development of pupils’ understanding of society’s shared and agreed values. It is about understanding that there are issues where there is disagreement and it is also about understanding that society’s values change. Moral development is about gaining an understanding of the range of views and the reasons for the range. It is also about developing an opinion about the different views.

 

Social development – young people working effectively with each other and participating successfully in the community as a whole. It is about the development of the skills and personal qualities necessary for living and working together in harmony and making a positive contribution to the school community and wider society. It is about functioning effectively in a multi-racial, multi-cultural society and developing into a tolerant and helpful human being. It involves growth in knowledge and understanding of society in all its aspects. This includes understanding people as well as understanding society’s institutions, structures and characteristics, economic and political principles and organisations, roles and responsibilities, and life as a citizen, parent or worker in a community. It also involves the development of the inter-personal skills necessary for successful relationships.

 

Cultural development – helping pupils to develop an understanding of their own culture and other cultures in their town, region and in the country as a whole. It is about understanding cultures represented in Europe and elsewhere in the world. It is about understanding and feeling comfortable in a variety of cultures and being able to operate in the emerging world culture of shared experiences provided by television, art, theatre, travel and the internet. It is about understanding that cultures are always changing and coping with change. Promoting pupils’ cultural development is intimately linked with schools’ attempts to value cultural diversity and prevent racism.

 

There are five parts to the SMSC regulations, which are shown below:

  • Enable pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self- confidence
  • Enable pupils to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the law
  • Encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative and understand how they can contribute to community life
  • Provide pupils with a broad general knowledge of public institutions and services in England
  • Assist pupils to acquire an appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures in a way that promotes tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions

 

It is possible demonstrate that these are met in a variety of ways, for example through the school ethos, religious and cultural activities, and also through formal teaching.

 

Desirable Outcomes and Possible Actions

It is possible to identify a number of desirable outcomes and possible actions for each of the five parts of SMSC.  The ideas listed below provide examples of behaviour/abilities/understanding that can be expected in pupils as a result of schools meeting their SMSC obligations.

 

Enable pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self- confidence

Desired outcomes

  • Respect for themselves and for others;
  • Awareness of their own and others’ beliefs, feelings, and values;
  • Develop a set of values, principles and beliefs, which may or may not be religious, which inform their perspective on life and their patterns of behaviour;
  • Ability to articulate their feelings and justify them through discussion, debate, and presentations to others;
  • Readiness to question things that could limit their self-knowledge, self-esteem, and self confidence – for example, lack of aspiration, discrimination (such as sexism, racism, etc), injustice, bullying, and so on;
  • Acquire the skills to be self-reliant and work independently or in a team;
  • A readiness to take on responsibility for their own actions;
  • Value a non-material dimension to life and consider the questions at the heart of existence (such as who am I, where am I going?);
  • An appreciation of the intangible – for example, beauty, truth, love, goodness, order – as well as for mystery, paradox, and ambiguity;
  • An increasing ability to reflect, and to learn from this reflection.

 

Possible actions

  • Promote teaching styles which value pupils’ questions and give them space for their own thoughts, ideas, and concerns;
  • Teachers should be acting as role models of the values desired in pupils
  • Ensure an environment is created where every child may reach their potential regardless of gender, race, disability, or other equalities issues;
  • Help pupils to be aware of their potential and support them to achieve it;
  • Where pupils already have religious or non religious beliefs, support and encourage these beliefs in ways which are personal and relevant to the pupils;
  • Provide opportunities for spiritual development through learning outside the classroom, for example drama, music, art, visits to museums, historic buildings;
  • Encourage pupils to explore and critically analyse what interests and inspires themselves and others;
  • Encourage pupils to reflect and learn from reflection;
  • Encourage individual endeavour and celebrate achievement and success, both within and outside the classroom, such as through drama, sports, music and outdoor pursuits;
  • Encourage pupils to work and cooperate as part of a team;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to develop leadership skills and challenge so they can take care of themselves and others, and develop self-reliance. celeberty rogane propecia

 

Enable pupils to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the law

Desired outcomes

  • Understanding of and respect for the laws of the land;
  • Ability to distinguish right from wrong, based on a knowledge of their own values, those widely held by society, and the laws of the land;
  • An understanding that ‘society’ is held together by a communal understanding of right and wrong, which may change over time;
  • Ability to think through the consequences of their own and others’ actions, and the confidence to act consistently in accordance with agreed principles, and especially to understand the impact that their own actions can have on others;
  • Respect for others’ needs, interests and feelings, as well as their own, and a desire to explore these;
  • Ability to make responsible and reasoned judgements on dilemmas of right and wrong;
  • Willingness and confidence to express their views on ethical issues and personal values;
  • An ability to respond appropriately to the immoral and the illegal;
  • An understanding of the need to review and reassess their values, codes and principles in the light of experience.

 

Possible actions

  • Teach pupils how today’s legal system has evolved and why it is important, and help them understand the law and the importance of abiding by it;
  • Provide a clear framework of values and behaviours which is promoted consistently through all aspects of the school, with teachers as role models;
  • Inform parents of school ethos and procedures so that what is learnt at school can be supported at home, and ensure this ethos aligns with the law of the land;
  • Give pupils opportunities across the curriculum to explore and develop moral concepts and values, such as right and wrong, justice, personal rights and responsibilities;
  • Reward good insight and behaviour;
  • Teach pupils about citizenship, and the importance of being a good citizen;
  • Discuss in an informed and balanced way breaches of agreed moral codes where they arise, and their impact on society and themselves;
  • Provide models of virtue through literature, humanities, sciences, arts, assemblies, relevant role models, and acts of worship;
  • Reinforce the importance of a cohesive, harmonious, law abiding society though images, posters, classroom displays, exhibitions, etc;
  • Address discrimination on the grounds of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age and other criteria, and promote racial and other forms of equality.

 

Encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative and understand how they can contribute to community life

Desired outcomes

  • Show respect for people, living things, property and the environment
  • Work effectively and respectfully with other pupils;
  • Share their own views and opinions with others, and work towards understanding and cohesion;
  • Participate in activities relevant to the communities they belong to;
  • Take part in democratic processes available to them, for example, voting or running for a student council;
  • Adjust to a range of social contexts by appropriate and sensitive behaviour;
  • Develop the ability to live alongside those from different cultures and beliefs;
  • Appreciate the rights and responsibilities of individuals within the wider social setting;
  • Reflect on their own contribution to society;
  • Understand how societies function and are organised in structures such as the family, the school and local and wider communities;
  • Understand the notion of interdependence in an increasingly complex society, and also understand that communities and societies function at a variety of levels;
  • Know about sections of society and other people less fortunate than themselves, and what they can do to help.

 

Possible actions

  • Foster a sense of community, with common and inclusive values which ensure that everyone, irrespective of ethnic origin, nationality, gender, ability, sexual orientation, and religious or non-religious beliefs, can flourish;
  • Encourage pupils to work co-operatively;
  • Provide positive group activities, for example, through assemblies, team activities, residential experiences, school theatre and music productions;
  • Encourage pupils to take responsibility for their actions, for example, respect for property, care of the environment, and developing codes of behaviour;
  • School linking or partnership work to give pupils the chance to mix with pupils from different areas/cultures/faith;
  • Help pupils to develop personal qualities which are valued in society, for example, thoughtfulness, honesty, respect for difference and sound moral principles;
  • Provide opportunities for participating in different communities – for example, religious, cultural, local and global;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to exercise leadership and responsibility;
  • Ensure that through lessons and other formal and informal settings opportunities are provided for pupils to demonstrate initiative, develop their interests and organise activities for themselves and others.

 

Provide pupils with a broad general knowledge of public institutions and services in England

Desired outcomes

  • A thorough understanding of British public institutions and services along with knowledge of how to use them and willingness to do so;
  • Understand what the public institutions and services do for people throughout the country;
  • Take part in democratic processes, for example, voting for or joining a student council;
  • Understand how citizens can express their views through the democratic process so they can influence decision makers;
  • Appreciate the rights and responsibilities of individuals within the wider social setting
  • Understand the strengths and advantages of democracy and how democracy works in the context of Britain and Europe in contrast to other forms of government

 

Possible actions

  • Teach pupils about democracy and citizenship, and the importance of being a good citizen;
  • Ensure that all pupils within the school have a voice that is listened to;
  • Ensure that pupils are aware of their rights and the rights of others as human beings;
  • Teach pupils about what public institutions and services are available, what they are for, and how they are funded;
  • Provide positive and effective links with the world of work (for example, shadowing, work experience, and visits from professionals) and the wider community (for example school visits, including to public institutions, taking part in community events);
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to learn about and engage in local and national democratic processes, including having democratic processes within the school such as a school council whose members are voted for by the pupils.

 

Assist pupils to acquire an appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures in a way that promotes tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions

Desired outcomes

  • An ability to recognise and understand their own cultural principles and values, and the dynamic and developmental nature of these;
  • An understanding of the influences which have shaped their own cultural heritage;
  • An ability to appreciate cultural diversity and accord dignity and respect to other people’s values and beliefs, to challenge racism, and to value race equality;
  • Tolerance of people with different cultural, religious, and non-religious beliefs;
  • Ability to interact positively with people of different cultural, religious, and non-religious beliefs.

 

Possible actions

  • Provide opportunities for pupils to explore their own cultural assumptions and values;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to participate in literature, drama, music, art, crafts and other cultural events and encourage pupils to reflect on their significance;
  • Provide opportunities for pupils to mix with children from other cultures, for example through school linking programmes;
  • Give pupils the opportunity to explore different values, beliefs, and cultures through a variety of approaches, including discussion and debate, in order to gain understanding;
  • Present authentic accounts of the attitudes, values and traditions of diverse cultures;
  • Develop partnerships with outside agencies and individuals to extend pupils’ cultural awareness, for example, theatre, museum, concert and gallery visits, resident artists and foreign exchanges;
  • Audit the quality and nature of opportunities for pupils to extend their cultural development across the curriculum, particularly developing an understanding of the cultures of the UK.

 

 

Improving the Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural (SMSC) Development of Pupils.  Non-Statutory Guidance for Independent Schools

 

Sources

  • DCSF.  Improving the Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural (SMSC) Development of Pupils.  Non-Statutory Guidance for Independent Schools
  • Ofsted.  School inspection handbook from September 2012
Share

Buying your iPads

iPads

There are three key factors in determining your supplier: price, availability of stock and support. I also include location as a fourth, but slightly less crucial, factor.

There are a number of suppliers available, from Apple direct to a wide range of Apple resellers.

 

Price

You should expect to secure a discount on the iPads and any accessories that you need. The size of discount you will get will vary, but the chances are you will be able to persuade any Apple reseller to price match their competitors. My experience was that Apple direct are unwilling to match the price of the resellers.

 

Availability of stock

Most of the Apple resellers will probably suffer from shortages of iPads and other Apple products at certain times of the year. This is especially the case around Christmas and following the release of a new product. It is worth discussing with any potential supplier whether they will be able to fulfil your needs and if they can what is the timescale.

 

Support

Many of the larger suppliers will have a dedicated education team with an Apple Distinguished Educator (ADE) on the staff. The ADE will be able to provide support and training. If you spend enough money in one go you will be able to receive a day’s free training.

 

Location

There are advantages in having a supplier on your doorstep as it will make accessing the support much easier. For the majority of schools their suppliers will all be located some distance away, but it is still worth considering if they are located close enough to make visiting the school in one day a possibility.

 

Choosing which iPad to buy

At the moment there are two types (generations) of iPads available: the iPad 2 and the iPad (whilst Apple simply call it the iPad it is referred to by many as the iPad 3, iPad retina display or 4th generation iPad!).

The key differences between the two can be summarised by the following:

 

iPad 2 iPad Verdict
Display A good quality screen, but not quite as sharp as the iPad 3 “Retina” display where individual pixels can’t be seen. iPad 3 screen is beautiful and sharp. Will it make a difference to teaching as the iPad 2′s is certainly adequate.
Processor 1Gz dual core processor with 512MB of RAM 1Gz dual core processor with 1000MB of RAM and a quad core graphics unit. It means that the iPad 3 will run a bit quicker (although some bench marking tests show the iPad 2 is quicker). You will notice the difference playing high end games
Siri Not available A voice activated assistant You maybe glad of its absence in the classroom!
Price (16GB) £329 £399 Not an insignificant difference especially when buying in bulk.
Camera 0.7 megapixel 5.0 megapixel Whilst the iPad 2 can record video in HD the iPad 3′s is significantly better.
Battery life Lasts longer in all of the tests. The better screen and processor use the bigger battery quicker. An obvious advantage for the iPad 2

The prices quoted in the table above are the recommended retail prices that include VAT. I have already mentioned that you should secure a discount and the school will not have to pay VAT.

 

Protecting the iPads: cases

Whilst there are no moving parts to break, the iPad does have beautiful, shiny screen that must be protected. You have probably read some of the horror stories that certain newspapers like to publish about massive percentages of iPads being broken by spoilt brats!

There is a very wide range of cases produced Buy Viagra by Apple and a number of different suppliers. The iPad cases generally will protect the iPad body and have a flip cover that protects the screen when closed and can be used as a stand when open.

If buying a class set you will probably wish to purchase identical cases whereas if you opt for a 1 to 1 approach then you may want to give students the freedom to choose from a range of recommended cases. Your iPad supplier should be able to give you a generous discount on cases.

 

Protecting the iPads: insurance

To guard against damage, loss or theft it is possible to take two approaches to insurance: self-insurance or to use an insurance company.

It is possible to purchase insurance for the iPads that insures against accidental damage, loss or theft. These policies can normally be purchased for any period between one and four years. You can expect to pay around £20 a year for this insurance with the per year cost falling for longer policy lengths.

Self insurance means that you don’t have to pay any insurance costs upfront, but you would have to pay out each time for the life of the iPad. If you buy iPad 2s at a cost of £250 per unit and insurance costs £62.50 for four years it will be cheaper to self-insure if you have to replace fewer than 1 in 4 iPads over that time period. This is obviously the riskier option, but it could work out to be the cheaper option over the four years.

 

My approach to buying your iPads

I contacted a number of resellers in addition to Apple directly. I found that the resellers all quoted around the same price and were certainly willing to price match their competitors. Apple themselves were the most expensive and unwilling to price match. I was then left with making a choice based upon the other factors I have already highlighted. I found a number of resellers were very supportive of the educational market and had an Apple Distinguished Educator (ADE) on the staff who would be able to support us after we had made any purchases. I am delighted with the company I have chosen to work with as I feel that they genuinely want to assist our school in achieving our vision; this is something that permeates throughout the business from the owner. They are also close enough to enable the ADE to visit our school in one day.

I have purchased iPad 2s for our staff and class sets. I did not feel that the extra cost of the retina display and a faster processor could be justified (£1,500 extra for one class set).

We have also bought iPads for those students entitled to Pupil Premium. I have bought iPad 3s for these students as well as paying for the insurance for the duration of their time at our school.

I have chosen two types of cases for our class sets. Both have a protective back cover and a magnetic front cover. I avoided the Apple Smart Case due to their higher cost than 3rd party suppliers.

We have opted to self insure at the moment. We haven’t had any damage to our iPads so far – I may just have been lucky! If we move to a 1 to 1 scheme I would insure the iPads for the duration of the student’s time with us.

 

Buying your iPads checklist

  • Decide upon a supplier
  • Choose which iPads to purchase
  • Choose which case to buy for the iPads
  • Make the decision between an insurance company and self-insurance
Share